Tuesday, November 12, 2013

dental onlay

What are dental onlays and inlays? The use of inlays and inlay is a conservative approach in the treatment of certain dental problems. Sometimes a tooth with a Crown would be on the top, cover and inlay or onlay are only a part of the tooth are restored. 

As such they are excellent for cosmetic dentistry for repair damaged teeth. Insoles & inlay, like for example the Mündung--known, how you work and sit or lie on the surface of the tooth. Insoles and inlay are made in a dental laboratory before they are bound to the tooth. Create a template dentist, a form of the tooth, so the inlay or onlay, talk. Has to add already visited at least two dental inlay or onlay process.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

insurance coverage

All families will need a financial plan which includes personal insurance coverage in order to cope in the event of accidents, death, illness and disability. As you are planning insurance coverage you will need to consider your economic situation, age and number of dependents. There are a confusing range of insurance plans and which ones are best for you will depend on numerous things. Life insurance for instance is vital if you have a spouse or dependent children but is obviously less crucial for people who do not have dependents. Everyone should purchase disability insurance as all of us need to be covered if we are unable to go to work. Below are short descriptions of some of the different kinds of personal insurance coverage available.

Monday, August 12, 2013

leads for roofing contractors

Have you ever wanted to live near the Great Lakes? Have you ever wished for stronger winters and a White Christmas every December? Then Michigan might just be the state for you. You can build a house that will last through dry summers and sometimes harsh winters; you need a house that can protect you from snow, wind, rain, and sun; and you need a roof to keep you warm and cool depending on the time of the year. Michigan leads for roofing contractors can help you get the roof finished, and with their help, you can blend in with the rest of your neighborhood.

Saturday, July 13, 2013

Welcome you at Denver roofing company blog!

OK, so you made it to our Denver Roofing Companies Blog! The purpose of this blog is actually not you to sleep... really! In a world of the sealing of flat roof of websites and blogs that as an encyclopedia is to read, no wonder why people have a hard time remain on other sites more than 10 seconds! The other goal of this blog is, help with your roof info needed and also help you not your roof! I'm now seriously! But maybe when you fall, and only the brake a leg, then it means you have more time for this blog here. 

So let's OK... bad joke, continue. Outdoor tips, I am roofing tiles by Denver business, you need a roofer, instructions, tips, roofs, gutters, etc. for rent roof tiles.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

raya hamper

raya hamper @ LK FLORIST...not to be missed.......full of great products and creating the hamper with you in mind Stay tune for our Raya season hamper....coming soon!!!!

Saturday, July 6, 2013

Nashville roofing

Our team of Nashville roofing serves the neighborhood with quality roofing roof repair, roof trim, cleaning and other general repairs of roofs work. Our staff is accredited and remodel specifically trained to meet your needs. The Otro Nashville roofing tiles Division is a one-stop answer to your home improvement needs. Treatment required in addition to your cover roof we do inside and outside, insulation, drywall, home siding, Home Windows, masonry and rain gutters. Although we are known for our metal roofing Nashville.

Friday, July 5, 2013

Tulsa roofers

Experienced Tulsa roofers, are you ready your home to its best look? Make sure that you have a new roof! Please contact one of these companies, the canopy in Tulsa, and you can get a the ball rolling to your home give most important improvements that help the resale value. Even if a roof beautiful a maintenance item, than you by a 20-year grind to a architectural shingle to go an attractive appearance of your House when its time to give it to your roof, to replace.

Thursday, July 4, 2013

Oklahoma City roofers

A new roof is a major investment in your home. Without one, leaks can compromise the structure. You want to be sure that you hire the best roofer for the job. Here is a checklist you can use when searching for the best Oklahoma City roofers

Open: You need to be sure that you have three tab shingles. Information about architectural shingles but listen, you can hear, see, party that other options are available and an open mind about it. Time frame: good Roofer had not to wait good teams and you, more than a week after insurance your roof available will be available. Pay for a new roof on own in Oklahoma, which most roofs are not paid by the insurance company as we hail storm of all time.

Some Really Interesting Facts About Mammals

The following are some really interesting facts about mammals. I'm sure you love and enjoy reading them.

Almost all mammals living in the country. Bats are the only mammals that can fly. Dolphins and whales are marine mammals. Giving birth to live young with few exceptions mammals. Platypus and Echidna are the two mammals, lay the eggs. Elephants have big feet and require more than five tons. But her feet are large, soft and spongy that they leave their weight hardly traces. Eucalyptus is used to drop to cough; Well, because they so much eucalyptus Koala bears food, smell like cough drops. This smell helps them to keep fleas away. Giraffes protect themselves, by great, so your goal is it, so great how can they grow as quickly as possible. You, why bats hang knowledge upside down? They hang upside down, because they do not right can stand up. Their leg bones are too thin to keep their body.

Monday, May 6, 2013

How To Pick The Best Garage Door

How to Find the Best Garage Door

If you want to maximize the value of your home, you'll find garage doors are an easy and affordable method to increase your home's curb appeal. A good garage door will distinguish it from the rest of the neighborhood. For something extra special, custom made garage doors can be designed to your specifications.

The most common types of garage doors are: Retractable, Canopy Side, and Hinged Sectional Retractable. Where limited space in your driveway is an issue, sectional garage doors are the right choice. They open and shut vertically, allowing cars to park very close to the door without keeping it from opening. Among the wide variety of designs, the most popular garage doors are sectional, upward acting, and self storing.

The Types of Garage Doors

Gone are the old manual doors. Today you'll find that remote controlled and motorized garage doors have produced a more usable garage. The most popular style is the overhead garage door.

The primary concern in planning your garage door is the material used. Selecting the best garage door materials for your needs will depend on a few things like the style of your home, and how warm you want your garage to be. There are 3 main materials for garage door construction: Wood, Steel and Fiberglass (GRP).

When you're planning to install a garage door, you must consider door type and materials. You can also incorporate into your plan such things as heated garages or unique window options.

The Most Popular Style is the Overhead Garage Door

Overhead garage doors are by far the most popular type of garage door available to homeowners. With automatic stop and begin features, people find overhead garage doors easy to use, with wonderful options and safety features.

Overhead garage doors work with a rolling system. The door rolls up and stores along the roof of the garage. Overhead door features to look for are that they are smooth, quiet and compact. Installing an overhead garage door is simple; do it yourself, or get help from the manufacturer. Popular garage door manufacturers include Garaga, Liftmaster, Raynor or DBCI.

The Appeal of Wood

Wood garage doors are preferred more for their appearance and affordability than for their durability.

You can select wood types like solid cedar for a durable garage door, which will last for years and look wonderful. Sections of roll-up wood doors may have either panel or flush construction. For panel doors, manufacturers fit several separate, rectangular panels into a wooden frame. Flush sections are made by fastening a plywood panel on top of a wooden frame.

The main disadvantage to a wooden garage door is that wood expands and contracts and can warp or crack as it weathers. It demands re-painting or refinishing every couple of years to keep it looking good and in top condition.

Steel Garage Doors Have Many Advantages

The main advantage to steel garage doors is that they won't warp, crack, or fall apart because of weather. With no painting or refinishing requirements, steel doors are a low maintenance possibility that will keep your home looking stylish. Nowadays most steel garage doors are made of hot-dipped galvanized steel that is vinyl clad or given a baked on polyester finish. They will not rust or require repainting like wooden doors.

Another important advantage of steel garage doors is that they achieve the look of wood without the maintenance. Some have grained steel skins that can be stained to look just like wood. A design mimicking carriage house doors has become quite popular for nearly a decade. Some manufacturers use composite or vinyl boards on the exterior of a steel door to make it look like an outward swinging door.

The only disadvantage to steel doors is that they dent and can be difficult to repair. A premium door is often 2 inches thick, filled with insulation, and clad in 24-gauge steel. Less-expensive doors are usually thinner and made of 28 gauge steel. So steel offers real benefits over wood; it costs less and it needs much less maintenance and with can look just like wood.

The Assets of Fiberglass

Fiberglass, sometimes called GRP, garage doors are chosen for locations where light is important or in salty ocean climates. GRP garage doors need only mild exterior cleaning to retain their quality finish. They generally they do not need to be stained or finished. The most popular style for a GRP garage door is the retractable garage door. Fiberglass is a tough and durable material which will keep looking good for years.


Each of garage door material has its own benefits: Steel up and over doors are sturdy and give great value for money; wood doors are insulated and have an appealing look, and fiberglass up and over garage doors are extremely low maintenance offering a timber effect without the maintenance of real wood. Which ever you pick you'll be sure that it will elevate the curb appeal and the value of your home, and increase your feeling of security.

Thursday, May 2, 2013

The Butterfly Effect - A Look At Vertical Doors

How about something remarkable. Something never before experienced by most drivers. Something that makes waves. How about the butterfly effect?

Butterfly doors, also known as vertical door or lambo doors, originated to solve a problem. The Lamborghini had a very wide base, and a traditional door design would not allow for easy entering and exiting, especially if parked next to anything. They devised a door hinge system that lifts the doors vertically, and only slightly out war, clearing the door of the opening, and also allowing the wide body car to still fit in traditional spaces.

These doors catch a lot of attention. When door open vertically, you get the "butterfly" effect, making waves wherever you are. People stop and notice these types of modifications because they are rare, unique, and very appealing. These kits are now available for most cars, and come as a universal kit that can be fitted to almost any vehicle. Some of the kits will require a little body work, but others are a direct bolt in. The hinges, gas shocks, and hardware may not look like $750 to $1000 worth of materials, but the finished results is well worth the money for most car enthusiasts and tuners.

We suggest professional installation for these types of kits, mainly because in a lot of cases, the inner fender wells need to be rolled or modified to fit the new brackets and hinges. Most of the kits are adjustable enough to create a unique vertical opening while keeping it fairly easy to get in and out of the vehicle. Look for kits that allow for both vertical and horizontal adjustments to be made for the best possible combination of style and comfort.

Butterfly doors are becoming the craze at most tuner events and shows. Some cars look better than other with the mods done to them, and you can probably find images of your car model with them installed somewhere on the internet. I would suggest seeing a finished product before investing the money. The kits are in most cases completely reversible if you are unsatisfied for any reason, or intend to sell the car at a future date.

If you want to turn you ride into a real showstopper, these kits are the way to go. They come in manual and automatic varieties. Vertical doors are a great addition to any show car. Vertical Doors, Inc. is credited with the patent on the design we are most familiar with. There have been several company create similar products marketed under the product "type" called vertical doors. They are also referred to as butterfly doors, or 90 degree doors. Either way, they give our daily drivers a nice exotic sports car look.

There are some varieties of doors out there that will fit the bill if you are looking for that extra something to add to your show car. There are the traditional "vertical" doors which open vertically. See picture below. These kits use specially made brackets and gas shocks to open the doors outward slightly, then upwards. They can be adjusted to open further our before going up to make it easier to get in and out of, as a common disadvantage to the door kits is the increased difficulty of getting in and out of the vehicle.

There are other types of door modifications that can be done, such as "suicide" doors that open exactly the opposite of traditional doors. The hinges are moved to the other side of the door opening so it swings the other way. Also a cool upgrade.

Still my personal favorite is the Dalorian style door as seen in back to the future. These doors are hinged in the center of the roof, and raise straight up allowing for easy access in and out of the vehicle. This type of modification would call for some extensive mods to the roof system, as well as some fabricated doors, but it would make for a serious upgrade!

If you are interested in trying to install your own vertical door conversion kits, be warned, it can be tricky, but here is a guide to help you in the process.

1. Lift the hood and remove left and right shield of front wheel.

2. With the door open pull out the rubber hose connecting the door and the door frame, draw out and cut the wire (wrap the two ends of every cut wires with friction tape and record the given numbers. If the wires are long enough, it 's not necessary to cut.) and then remove the rubber hose of the wires.

3. With door closed remove the factory top door hinge.

4. Test and draw the placement of the mechanism. Pay attention to the moving way of the swing arm and ensure the swing arm up to 90° not to touch the shield or fender. So the mechanism must be in a proper height, which can be tested by the shield.

5. Grind the installation placement of the chassis or hammer any extrusions that may hinder the base plates from sitting flat. You may also grind and cut the base plate and door plate as needed.

B. After grinding the installation placement, test the proper distance with the shield and check and observe any places that may prevent the base plate and the swing arm from moving. In this situation you must draw a line around the base plate when it is in the proper, and then cut or hammer along the perimeter till not to hinder.

C. In cars with small spaces between the chassis surface and the fender there will not be sufficient room to install. It can be solved as follows: with the position of the base plate determined, draw a line around the base plate when it is in the proper position, and then cut along the perimeter to allow the base plate to slide below the surface.

6. Determine the holding position and space. Draw the position of the safety arch on the base plate and cut it. Cut a slot in the chassis to accommodate the arch, and if the base plate is below the chassis surface for your application make additional space for adjustment with a hex key.

7. Next you should cover the base plate, door, and the rest parts of the door mechanism in welding deflection paper with the exception of the surface of the surface that will get welded for the surface protection.

8. When the door mechanism clings to the chassis, door place, and moves smoothly and
is proper in both horizontal and vertical direction after testing again, weld spots around the perimeter of the base plate and the door plate. When you feel the welds are sturdy enough, remove the down door hinge. You may observe and test whether the door is in the correct motion and position by swinging it out and up manually. Now you can make adjustments at the door outward motion screws, safety set screw and door height screws etc. on the door mechanism.
9. Determine and draw on the shield or fender the position space of the swing arm's motion and cut it. Test it again and cut the inner lip to provide clearance for the swing arm.
10. Once you are satisfied with the operation and placement like opening, closing, lifting and falling of the door and door mechanism, hammer the hinge center axis of the mechanism from top to bottom and then remove the door. Make a strong weld around the entire perimeter of the base plate and door plate. (Parts must be prevented from broiling of the high temperature while welding.)

11. Grind and scuff the welds surface and mask the undercoat paint and top coating to prevent rust.

12. Lube the moving surfaces of the door mechanism with heavy waterproof grease and then close the door, align the hinge holes and interpose the center axis to the holes form top to bottom and then hammer it well and smoothly.

13. When the door is open up to the maximum angle, clear up the wires. Measure the wires and connect to the required length with other wires if it is not long enough. Remember to connect with the numbers while cutting and to mask the joints with the insulation tapes. With the wires plaited into cluster, fixed at the bottom of the swing arm with plastic and string.

14. Open the door and rotate it to the highest point, screw two ball joints into the swing arm and gas spring connecting plot respectively with gas spring screws and then determine and mark the spot where the ball joint will get mounted on the chassis.

15. Put the door down for now and disconnect the gas spring ball screw form the gas spring connecting plot and then hammer or grind the fixed position of the connecting plot and weld it well on the fixed place. Paint for dust prevention.

16. Open the door to the highest point and screw the gas spring ball points into the connecting plot and lock the ball points on the swing arm tightly at the same time. And test the doors motion. The swing arm should be parallel and not interferes with the gas spring or other parts when the door moves up and down.

17. With the door closed, test the door's horizontal motion until the door is aligned with the latch and closes perfectly. Adjust the safety arch until the door mechanism no longer interferes with the shield or fender when the door out all the way horizontally. Then set the horizontal motion screws to correspond with the angle that the safety arch rubs the inside of the lifting arm when up. The closer you make these two adjustments, the more sturdy the door will feel going up and resting in the vertical position. Set the vertical height limiter adjustment as high as you wish provided that the door does not hit the shield or other parts.

18. If the door panel and/or door metal hits the shield or comes too close to the shield on the way up it must be cut. If the door panel must be cut first mark a line that will allow clearance. Then peel back the upholstery, make the cut and wrap the upholstery over the new edge with spray adhesive.

19. Test it again until no any hinder and satisfied with everything; seal the screw adhesive to all the screw points.

20. Mount the shield, fender etc. and put down the hood. This will complete the installation.

Good luck and stay TUNED!

Monday, April 22, 2013

4 Hot Tips for Replacing a Garage Door

What Kind of Garage Door should I buy?

When looking for a garage door, you notice that there are two major designs: tilt-up doors and sectional roll-up doors. Sectional roll-up doors are more expensive than tilt-up doors, but the extra cost is well worth it.

Tilt-up doors consist of a single panel of material. To open the door, you have to pull it out and pivot it up to slide it along the roof of your garage. Sectional roll-up doors, on the other hand, are made of a number of horizontal sections. Each section is hinged to the next section, allowing the door a certain degree of flexibility. Because the door is mounted on rollers, to open a sectional roll-up door you just have to lift the door and it will roll into place along the roof of your garage.

Sectional roll-up doors are superior to tilt-up doors. From a purely practical point they take up less room. Because you don't have to pull the door out, there will be more room in front of your garage door for things like your car. The door will also take up less room in the garage, since it can be placed higher up than a tilt-up door.

What should my Garage Door be made of?

Garage doors, both tilt-ups and sectional roll-ups, are primarily made from wood or steel. Of these two materials, wood is the cheaper and - arguably - more attraction option. If you decided to get a wooden door please keep in mind that just like your deck, a wooden garage door will be more easily damaged by the weather than a steel door. If you live in a particularly hot or cold climate, you may find your self with a warped or damaged garage door.

Steel garage doors are more expensive, but you will not face the same problems that you would encounter with a wood door. If you decide to get a steel door the main thing to check is that it has been properly prepared to prevent rust.

Garage doors are also occasionally made with aluminium or fibreglass. While both of these materials are less expensive than steel doors, you should be careful when using them. Neither material is as strong as steel so they will not hold up to the usual wear and tear of a garage door. And once again depending on your climate, they will not be as energy efficient as a steel door if that is a concern to you.

How do I look after my Garage Door?

Just like any other exterior surface on your house, your garage door will need periodic maintenance to keep it working smoothly and looking as good as the rest of your house. You'd be surprised how the look of your garage door not only affects the overall look of your house, but the perceived value of your house too.
No matter what material your garage door is made of, it should be washed regularly. If you have a wood door, you should repaint the door every other year to ensure that the wood stays protected. If you have a steel door, you can give it a yearly shine with car wax

To prolong the life of the mechanical parts, you should lubricate all moving parts with motor oil whenever the door starts to feel sluggish.

Safety Concerns with Garage Doors

Every year, children are seriously injured from accidents involving garage doors. To avoid these preventable accidents, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that you should only use automatic garage door openers if they have an automatic reverse function. This will reverse the closing of the garage door if an obstacle is encountered.

Steve Dolan is a homeowner and DIY enthusiast. Click Everything For Your Garage Door [http://www.allgaragedoorsweb.com] for articles and resources for all your garage door needs
What Kind of Garage Door should I buy?

When looking for a garage door, you notice that there are two major designs: tilt-up doors and sectional roll-up doors. Sectional roll-up doors are more expensive than tilt-up doors, but the extra cost is well worth it.

Tilt-up doors consist of a single panel of material. To open the door, you have to pull it out and pivot it up to slide it along the roof of your garage. Sectional roll-up doors, on the other hand, are made of a number of horizontal sections. Each section is hinged to the next section, allowing the door a certain degree of flexibility. Because the door is mounted on rollers, to open a sectional roll-up door you just have to lift the door and it will roll into place along the roof of your garage.

Sectional roll-up doors are superior to tilt-up doors. From a purely practical point they take up less room. Because you don't have to pull the door out, there will be more room in front of your garage door for things like your car. The door will also take up less room in the garage, since it can be placed higher up than a tilt-up door.

What should my Garage Door be made of?

Garage doors, both tilt-ups and sectional roll-ups, are primarily made from wood or steel. Of these two materials, wood is the cheaper and - arguably - more attraction option. If you decided to get a wooden door please keep in mind that just like your deck, a wooden garage door will be more easily damaged by the weather than a steel door. If you live in a particularly hot or cold climate, you may find your self with a warped or damaged garage door.

Steel garage doors are more expensive, but you will not face the same problems that you would encounter with a wood door. If you decide to get a steel door the main thing to check is that it has been properly prepared to prevent rust.

Garage doors are also occasionally made with aluminium or fibreglass. While both of these materials are less expensive than steel doors, you should be careful when using them. Neither material is as strong as steel so they will not hold up to the usual wear and tear of a garage door. And once again depending on your climate, they will not be as energy efficient as a steel door if that is a concern to you.

How do I look after my Garage Door?

Just like any other exterior surface on your house, your garage door will need periodic maintenance to keep it working smoothly and looking as good as the rest of your house. You'd be surprised how the look of your garage door not only affects the overall look of your house, but the perceived value of your house too.

No matter what material your garage door is made of, it should be washed regularly. If you have a wood door, you should repaint the door every other year to ensure that the wood stays protected. If you have a steel door, you can give it a yearly shine with car wax

To prolong the life of the mechanical parts, you should lubricate all moving parts with motor oil whenever the door starts to feel sluggish.

Safety Concerns with Garage Doors

Every year, children are seriously injured from accidents involving garage doors. To avoid these preventable accidents, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that you should only use automatic garage door openers if they have an automatic reverse function. This will reverse the closing of the garage door if an obstacle is encountered.

Steve Dolan is a homeowner and DIY enthusiast. Click Everything For Your Garage Door [http://www.allgaragedoorsweb.com] for articles and resources for all your garage door needs

Thursday, March 28, 2013

A Review of the Most Popular Garage Door Openers

Genie, Chamberlain, Sears, Wayne-Dalton, Linear, and Universal (SkyLink) make some of the best garage door openers on the market. The following product reviews should be useful for those in the market for a garage door opener.

The Genie® Company is one of the most well-known and trusted companies in the US. Founded in 1923 under the name of the Alliance Manufacturing company, Genie manufactures consumer, industrial as well as military products. The Genie® brand of garage door openers are very popular for their high power remote-controlled garage door opening systems.

Genie produces a wide range of garage door openers and the most popular brands from Genie are: the Excelerator, the Screw Drive and the Chain Glide. Other brands include the Alliance, the Blue Max, the Crusader, Python, Pro-Max, Lift-a-door, OverHead Door, Norelco, Code-Dodger and Intellicode.

Genie uses state-of-the-art technology in its garage door openers. The Intellicode® remote access security system changes the security code to one of billions of combinations each time the transmitter is used, thus making it one of the safest systems in the world. Its Sate-T-Beam(TM) infrared beam system can sense the presence of objects in the door's path and can thus prevent damage to equipment. Genie garage door openers can be installed on both single as well as double doors. They use ½ horsepower and can work on doors that are up to 8 feet high. Genie garage door openers open twice as fast as other garage door openers but close at normal speeds. They are very quiet, have a bright, wide-angle lighting and powerful motor design and can work in any weather conditions. Such advanced technologies make the Genie brand of garage door openers most popular in the world.

Chamberlain GmbH based in Saarwellingen, Germany is a principal supplier of residential garage door openers, commercial and residential gate operators, and remote controls in the world. The company has offices in France, England, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic and Singapore. Chamberlain products are available almost across the whole world.

Chamberlain offers garage door openers in commercial as well as residential varieties. Chamberlain®, Whisper Drive® and Power Drive® Garage Door Openers are the most popular brands from Chamberlain.
LiftMaster® is the most popular brand from Chamberlain. This range also includes the Liftmaster garage door opener remotes, replacement parts, mini transmitters, keychain remotes and other accessories. LiftMaster garage door openers are available in different drive and horsepower modes and are combined with a wide range of accessories and options. The LiftMaster range contains: the Estate Series, the Premium series and the Contractor series. These are available in the belt drive; screw drive as well as in chain drive models.

Chamberlain's Power Drive® and Whisper Drive® belong to the residential garage door opener category in the do-it-yourself range. The Elite(TM) range contains premier residential and commercial gate operators and access control systems. The Sentex® range is for secure residential and commercial garages.

Sears Holdings Corporation, parent of Kmart and Sears, Roebuck and Co., is the third largest broad line retailer in the US. Sears Holdings is a leading supplier of tools, lawn and garden, home electronics, and automotive repair and maintenance. It supplies the Craftsman range of garage door openers.

Craftsman supplies power tools, storage chests and cabinets, bench power tools, mechanics tools, power tool accessories, general hand tools, compressor tools, carpentry tools and home security and garage door openers and accessories. The Craftsman range of garage door openers consist of simple ½ hp garage door opener, ¾ hp garage door opener in chain drive models. Other products include the universal remote control conversion kit with 1 remote, the 10ft chain drive extension kit, the 10ft extension kit for garage door opener, the 8ft extension kit for garage door opener, the 8ft rail extension kit, the Remote control, 3-function security, keyless entry pad, plug-in light control for garage door opener, the wireless garage door monitor and the extension kit (screw drive).

Wayne Dalton, established in 1954, is the producer and supplier of the safest residential and commercial garage doors and garage door openers in the US. Wayne Dalton supplies two kinds of garage door openers: wall mount and ceiling mount. The wall mount openers, an exclusive product from Wayne Dalton, can be mounted on the wall beside the door. This helps to eliminate the chains, belts, screw drive and tract that usually clutter the garage ceiling. This model also helps to eliminate noise and vibration to a large extent.

The Linear Corporate is a major producer of security systems like garage door and garage door openers. Linear produces garage door openers accessories like the Linear Act 21 key chain transmitter, Linear DR3A Linear Moore-O-Matic gate or garage opener receiver, Linear DT2A gate or garage door opener replacement transmitter, Linear DTC Moore-O-Matic Delta 3 Remote (same as DTD or DT) gate or garage door opener replacement transmitter, Linear DTKP wireless keypad, Linear MDR Megacode System single channel receiver, Linear MDT-1 and MDT-2 Megacode gate or garage door openers, Linear MDTK wireless keypad model, Linear MT-1B channel visor block coded transmitter, Linear MT-2B channel visor block coded transmitter etc.

Linear also makes the Stanley range of garage door opener parts and accessories like Vemco, Quiet Glide, LightMaker, Home Innovative, Whistler, Popular Mechanics, SecureCode.

Friday, March 1, 2013

Guide to Patio Door Types

Traditional or modern? Classic or contemporary? Varying tastes and different architectures throughout the years, as well as innovations and enhanced lifestyles, have given rise to the wide choice in patio door variations currently available in Britain. This article aims to describe the types of patio doors - their styles and functionality, similarities and differences, together with some of their main advantages and popular options - in order to provide readers with an informative guide.

Styles - French doors, sliding panels: retractable: folding doors, slide-and-pivot doors.

The latest patio doors innovation is slide-and-pivot doors. Developed and launched since 2007/8, slide-and-pivot doors incorporate the major benefits of bifolding doors and sliding patio doors. Comprising a number of individual glazed panels that fit snugly together when closed, there is a 'master' door that can be opened with a standard (pivot) action, enabling the other doors to be moved, individually, along the top and bottom guides; as each door is moved to the end of the guides, it can also pivot open to increase the access width between the divided areas ( to a suggested maximum of approximately 8 metres).

Because slide-and-pivot doors have no hinges, there is no requirement for a sturdy side frame; its only purpose is to cover the gasket that seals the double glazed unit. This means that the views afforded through the expanse of patio doors have minimal interruptions. At the time of writing, there are two versions of frame-less glass doors available in the UK, both using the slide-and-pivot technique: one manufacturer supplies their frameless glass doors with kite-marked double glazed units which have a visible seal, the other uses an almost transparent method of sealing their double glazing. Contemporary by design, the absence of visible characteristics makes frameless glass doors a viable option for period properties.

Bi Folding doors were launched around the turn of the century; they can be installed in place of French doors, where both doors are hinged to fold as they open together to one side. Bi folding doors can also span an opening to around 7 metres wide, depending on the frame chosen. A 'master' door can be placed amongst the doors, at the ends or in the middle, wherever the opening is required; this door is a standard (pivot) opening door which enables the other doors to be pushed to the side or sides of the aperture, resulting in a sliding-folding action, concertina-style, to maximise the width of the opening between home and garden or conservatory.

Originally, patio doors were all of the French Door variety; that is, a pair of doors that are hinged at the sides and open from the middle, each door pivoting in- or out-wards. French doors are still popular, especially with builders of new homes, as they are comparatively cheap and easy to accommodate in place of windows and offer an alternative evacuation route for families, especially for elderly or disabled people, to meet improved fire safety requirements.

Arguably, French doors could be considered as retractable as each door can be pulled back. The advantage of retractable doors is that maximum access is possible between the two sides of the aperture whereas sliding panel doors generally overlap unless built to retract into a recess.

In the mid-20th century, sliding doors became very popular - two or three panels of glass that slide along grooves in the floor. To distinguish them from traditional French doors, they were marketed with the thoroughly modern name of Patio Doors and this is often the image people have today when that term is used. Easily installed in place of a window, the immediate advantages were additional natural light and access to the garden. They also became a popular option to use where a pivot door opening space was limited or where the aperture was wider than a pair of French doors. Older installations were typically single-glazed, prone to warping and usually became difficult to slide open and closed. Still available today but in a developed form with double glazing and rollers for easier sliding, the popularity of sliding doors during this century has declined as bifolding doors gained market share.

Frame Styles - timber, metal, pvc, composite, frameless, profiles and sight lines.

Patio doors comprise an outer frame plus individual door frames. These can be made from wood (soft- and/or hard-wood), metal or alloys (usually aluminium), pvc (polyvinyl chloride, a thermo-plastic polymer - the 'u' stands for unplasticised) or a composite material, which may comprise any of the foregoing materials plus grp (glass reinforced polymer). There is also a style known as frameless, where the vertical sides of each door have no frames.

Generally, timber frames are considered more traditional and can look beautiful! Hard wood such as oak is, as the name suggests, far more hard-wearing than a soft wood such as pine. Weather, especially strong sun, can take its toll on timber frames which could need to be varnished or painted annually. Wooden frames can swell and shrink with humidity, therefore opening and closing doors can require force and gaps can allow draughts in colder temperatures.

Metal frames, usually aluminium, provide strength in compact form. As notoriously good conductors (which is a bad attribute for insulation), frames made from aluminium are thermally-broken, which is a good attribute. It means that the metals on the inside and outside of the door frames are not joined, preventing the temperatures from being transferred between them. A bare metal frame would look completely unattractive so it is powder-coated in a choice of over 100 standard colours, including a white that resembles pvc.

As with timber, the quality of pvc frames available can vary - and generally, you get what you pay for. The better ones will usually be reinforced with metal, internally, for greater strength but the cheaper options can be a nightmare to live with - sticking, twisting, splitting, discolouring, warping - often within a very short time. Most usually supplied as white, some manufacturers offer limited colour options or wood effect finishes.

Generally stronger than pvc, composite patio door frames vary with each manufacturer, offering a variety of finishes.

Whilst frameless doors have no side frames, the top and bottom of each door requires a mechanism, typically presented in aluminium, to allow it to slide within the top and bottom guides. Frameless glass doors have the best sight lines.

Sight lines is the term used to describe the interruptions in the view through the doors; in other words, the width of the vertical opaque areas between the glass when the doors are closed. On hinged doors, such as French doors and bi folding doors, timber and pvc frames generally have broad sight lines because, unlike aluminium, narrower frames would not be strong enough to be fit for purpose. As a guide to the width of two frames together, cheaper pvc door frames can exceed 200mm, aluminium frames are typically between 135mm and 160mm and frameless patio doors sight lines are under 40mm. Depending on the width of each door and number of doors to be installed, the difference in glass to frame ratio could be significant.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Manual Door Closers - Do You Have an Open and Shut Case?

During the past several years I have been contacted many times regarding door injury claims related to manual door closers. In response to numerous inquires asking if I have published any manual door closer articles similar to the primers I have done on automatic pedestrian doors, I am offering this article for general information to assist attorneys in determining potential issues relating to manual door closer mechanisms.

Manual door closers are ubiquitous. We take advantage of their service on a daily basis without usually noticing that they are in place or that they are doing their job correctly. It is when something is seriously wrong with these closers that they become blatantly noticeable and potentially dangerous.

Manual door closers can be as simple as a spring on an old screen door, a cannon ball weight on an antique house gate, or as sophisticated as a modern day hold open device electronically integrated with a smoke or heat detector connected to a centrally monitored alarm system. This article will not discuss specific brands, manufacturers or proprietary construction aspects of these closers, instead it will discuss the most common reasons that manual door closers can create injury claims. This general discussion is meant to deal with door or frame surface mounted door closers. While concealed and center pivot door closers are common in some applications, the most prevalent and common cause of serious personal injuries pertaining to manual door closers primarily relate to surface mounted closers. No discussion of building requirements, code compliance, or ADA parameters pertaining to door closers will be addressed in this article.

How Do They Work?

In general terms, a manual door closer is designed to assist a person using a doorway allowing them to smoothly and effectively open and shut a door without the need to physically return the door to the framed opening themselves. When properly adjusted, there will be a slight "back-pressure", giving the user some feedback as to the weight of the door, followed by a smooth transition as the door glides easily open in front of the user. Upon reaching the maximum set opening of the door, the closer takes full control dampening the opening forces, quietly and gently closing the door until the door is back in the frame, latched and ready for the next user.

Does Cost Affect Their Performance?

There are many price ranges and quality levels of door closers currently available on the market. In most major commercial installations there is a tendency to standardize the door closers throughout the facility. Hotels, hospitals, and shopping malls typically use a heavy duty type of closer that when properly installed and adjusted should provide many years of trouble free service to the user. Maintaining all door closers for proper function and control is essential as with all mechanical devices. In apartment and office buildings budgetary constraints sometimes lead to the decision to use a mid range or lower priced closer. Sometimes a foreign made lower quality "look-alike" closer is substituted for a domestic made, quality product leading to premature failure of the closer mechanism and/or erratic and inconsistent operation.

Choosing Your Door Closer

Many architects and designers do not have the foresight or knowledge to realize that the door closer is one of the most highly used pieces of equipment in any building, and they often make the wrong decision to use lower quality products in an effort to mistakenly and inappropriately save on building material costs. This choice of a lower-cost closer, combined with poor quality hinges, cheap door locks and other low quality installed hardware, affects the functions of the lower end door closers. The combination of all of the lower priced components can multiply the potential for premature failure of any door system. All door components installed on a door, in conjunction with the door frame work as a team, and require proper maintenance and periodic inspections to assure safe and effective operation. The choice to use the best quality hardware does not always ensure a "bullet-proof" doorway, but along with proper maintenance and adjustment, the higher priced quality hardware is money well spent over the long run. In general, the higher the quality of the individual components, the easier the long term maintenance.

Why Can Door Closers Cause Injuries?

Based on my experience as a door and hardware contractor and forensic expert for doors and door components, here are the three most common reasons that injuries occur due to door closer malfunctions. While this is not an exhaustive list, and there are always new and unique situations, these issues happen repeatedly and tend to set a trend for how injuries develop. (1) Door closers are misused, (2) Door closers are misunderstood, (3) Door closers are improperly installed.


There are a variety of reasons that a facility uses the wrong hardware. Generally, the selection of the type, brand, style, and capacity are specified improperly. Cost constraints are often a key reason. In some cases this is due to the poor direction and discretion of designers or architects. Many times hardware sales representatives solicit offices of architects and designers pitching and promoting products that are not always the correct choice for a specific application. These sales representatives can convince a designer that their products are universally applicable, and even though there are often significant problems with these installed products, architects are very seldom alerted. It is not until the design firm is included in litigation for an injury that they become concerned with their methods of choice. Many times architects are protected by a time warranty parameter that is used in an attempt to limit their contractual responsibility. Most architects or designers have never worked in the field of door and hardware sales, nor have they ever participated in product installation, usage, and long term application. These architects are no more qualified to specify a door closer product than they would be to work as a surgeon, just because they designed a medical suite space. Sales representatives often provide financial incentives, promises of future project leads, and assurance that their promoted product is as good as the more expensive hardware. Normally, these promises come with a potential for a reduced cost, rebate, or perceived savings to the end user. Sometimes, foreign made door closers are substituted for a higher quality domestic door closer without the knowledge of the end user. The products may appear similar, however in reality the promises and warranties made by the sales representative may not be realized. Sales representatives tend to come and go, and long before many projects are completed the sales rep has moved on, leaving the end user ultimately responsible for the problems that will arise. Incorrect, undersized or oversized closers often get installed leading to problematic performance at the direction of the uninformed or ill-informed "design professionals. Lower product costs do not usually equal higher performance in the long run!


Many times, the primary cause of door closer failures is the direct result of improperly trained or unsupervised maintenance personnel. Most domestic door closers are evaluated, tested and approved for sale prior to being brought to the market. They have gone through stringent testing, have been rated for longevity, usage in fire, and are warranted for a specified lifetime. Many manufacturers will offer replacement of products when periodic maintenance has been performed by trained individuals. Often, the higher quality door closer bodies have a "built date" stamped onto the closer body. The more reputable manufacturers rely upon this date to establish the lifetime of the closer body. This is based on presumed cycles of usage, correct adjustment, and proper appropriate maintenance. Appropriate maintenance is necessary to assure the safe and proper functioning of the door closer mechanism. Many times, individuals charged with maintaining a facility have little or no training with regard to door hardware, especially door closers. These workers often make random improper adjustments, create and compound existing problems due to partial or complete lack of knowledge and are sometimes the genesis of the ultimate failure of a door closer, leading to serious bodily injury. In many facilities, these "maintenance" workers are usually called upon to fix everything from a leaking toilet to replacing a burned out light bulb. Facility employed maintenance workers are often paid low wages and are directed by management to attempt to correct deficiencies when doors do not function correctly. In an effort to save costs, trained hardware professionals are rarely called in. Many times, the door closers have been so badly damaged by these inappropriate and random adjustments that the entire door closer must be replaced. Normally, replacing or rebuilding the door closer because of improper maintenance far outweighs the expense of a periodic maintenance program performed by professionals. There is no substitute for professional evaluation and maintenance when it comes to assuring the safe, code-compliant, and proper operation of all doors and door hardware.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Save Money When Your House Sells By Inspecting The Doors Before The Home Inspector Arrives

As with windows, doors come in many different sizes and materials. Examples of materials are wood, metal, fiberglass, glass, acrylic and composite.

Styles include solid core, hollow core, raised panel, flat panel, louvered, bifold, bypass, accordion, pocket, hinged, tracked, fire, pet, garage, patio, "French", "Dutch", double and so forth.

Each door has specification requirements for its use. With their many components and functions, doors are a bit more complicated than windows but some of the information is similar.

Don't get distracted by door descriptions. When inspecting you will be looking for the physical condition and operation of the door and also making sure that the proper door is being used.

Requirements for interior doors are less restrictive than for exterior doors. Exterior doors may be used on the interior of the building but an interior door should not be used for an exterior application.

In other words, a hollow core door should not be used for an exterior exit door. This is not only for security reasons but also hollow core doors do not provide adequate insulating properties and resistance to weathering.

In addition, a solid core fire rated door is required between the living space and the attached garage. I will elaborate more on the fire door requirements below.

Begin your inspection at the front door, which is usually the first door encountered when entering the home.
Look at the front door. Is there anything that jumps out at you?

Is it a solid core exterior door?

How do you determine if it is a solid core door?

Knock on the face of the door with your knuckles to hear if it sounds solid. If you are not sure, try comparing the sound made by knocking on an interior hollow core bypass closet door. The solid core door will create a dull noise and the hollow core door will sound like a wooden drum.

As you approach the door, look at the way it hangs in the jamb (the trim material that makes up the frame surrounding the door).

Check the reveal (the space between the door and the frame or jamb).

Is the gap in the reveal relatively even? An eighth of an inch variance in this area is common. Any more than that could be due to loose hinges, deterioration or poor installation.

Next, inspect the condition of the door face or surface. Is it deteriorated, scratched or damaged in any way? Hollow core doors and even solid core doors with a veneer skin may delaminate when subjected to severe weather conditions.

Are there any cracks in the door edge around the latch?

Front exterior wood doors often have panels. Check to see if any of the panels are cracked or damaged.

Front exterior doors may also have glazing (glass) panels. Check to see if any of the glazing is cracked, broken or has lost its seal. Is the glass tempered?

Next, open the door, straddle the front edge of the door and grab hold of the knobs. Gently lift up using your legs (NOT your back or arms) to determine if the doorknob is tight and the hinges are well secured to the jamb. If you notice a lot of play or movement at the hinge area, it may simply mean that the screws are loose. Tightening them with the proper screwdriver may resolve this symptom. Sometimes the hinge screws are fine but the hinge pin may be worn. In that case the hinge may need to be replaced.

Once you have made certain the hinges are secure recheck the reveal around the door. Securing the hinges may correct some if not the entire reveal problem. If the door did not latch properly before, that problem may also be corrected by tightening the hinges.

Next, check to see if the door will actually latch.

You would be amazed how many times I encountered doors that did not latch. The homeowners were often surprised and commented, "We never close that door." I replied, "Well I can certainly understand that but the new owners might want it to latch for some reason.

Doors that do not latch could indicate a number of issues discussed below. Make a note at this point if the door does not latch.

Does the door stick in the frame at any point, drag on the floor covering or bind at the striker plate of the latch? The striker plate is the metal plate screwed into the doorjamb where the latch catches to secure the door. Does the door swing open or close on its own?

Is there any unusual noise or squeaks when the door is opened, closed or latched?

Do the knobs and door lock operate properly or do they need some lubrication or possible adjustments?

Sometimes just tightening the screws of the hardware will eliminate problems.

I often noticed that when the doorknob screws were positioned top to bottom instead of side to side, the privacy lock would not work properly. Check the orientation of the doorknob screws. They should be parallel with the floor.

Check to see if the deadbolt latches are able to fully extend into the mortise hole in the jamb. If the deadbolt latch does not fully extend, the bolt can be pushed back into the unlocked position.

Try this if you have access to a deadbolt lock. With the door open, engage the deadbolt part way. Stop before you hear the "click" of the lock mechanism. Push on the bolt. You will actually be able to push the bolt back into the door with your finger. Push on the bolt after you hear the "click." The bolt will not move.

If you are not able to hear or feel the "click" when locking the deadbolt, the lock is not properly engaged. The mortise hole in the jamb is not deep enough to allow the bolt to travel far enough to fully engage. It is not secure.

Home inspectors will report on the presence of double deadbolt locks. Some will report them as a hazard. Double deadbolts are those locks that can only be opened from the outside or the inside with a key. My reports used to say this:

FYI: A locked double deadbolt lock could be a hazard in the event of an emergency if the key is not available. 

I recommend double deadbolt locks be replaced before the home inspector arrives.

Check the striker plates in the jamb. If the striker plates are loose, damaged or missing, repair or replace them.

Check the jamb itself. Is it split, damaged, deteriorated or water stained? Make a note on any of these conditions.

Home inspectors and termite contractors carefully investigate water stains found around doorframes. Water intrusion is a serious issue particularly when addressing walls and exterior siding.

Exterior doors will need to be weather-stripped. There should not be any light passing in around the door from the exterior.

Pay particular attention to the sweep at the bottom of the door. Weather-stripping is inexpensive and easy to install. The bottom sweep can usually be adjusted downward to sweep the threshold properly.

Is there a doorstopper preventing the knob from hitting the wall?

As you move into other areas of the building, check the condition and operation of any bifold, bypass and accordion closet doors. Along with the considerations mentioned above, they should slide in the tracks and operate with ease without coming off the track or dragging the floor covering. Broken mirrors on bypass closet doors should be replaced.

When checking any interior or exterior double doors, determine if the pins of the secondary door can be properly secured at the top and bottom. Do they operate and engage smoothly?

Check patio doors and screen doors for smooth operation and proper locking. Home inspectors will report missing or damaged screen doors.

Patio doors often have window coverings. Many home inspectors do not report on window coverings but you should check and note their condition to be sure they operate properly. Your Realtor will usually not recommend replacing window coverings unless the home shows badly. The buyers will probably want to select their own.

On many of my inspections the buyers were present. I could hear them discussing how they would redecorate the building to reflect their own personality. New floor and window coverings were almost always on the list for replacement. Realtors often suggest cleaning or removing these items but not replacing them.

The glazing in patio doors should be tempered. Check for lost dual pane seals in dual pane patio doors and the fixed glazing.

Fire doors are an important consideration. Such doors are located between the living space and an attached garage. They may also be located at the stairway to the basement or any other area that may contain flammable materials, a water heater or furnace.

Fire doors should have an operable automatic closer that will cause the door to self close and latch when it is released. If the fire door has an automatic closer but does not latch when it is released, the closer should be adjusted or replaced. Sometimes the floor covering can obstruct the proper operation of the closer causing the door to drag.

Fire doors are installed to suppress fire from entering into a living space but only for a limited amount of time. Any modifications to these doors create a possible hazard, such as a pet door.

Pet doors installed in a fire door compromises its fire suppression function. I realize we need to help our pets get in and out of our buildings for obvious reasons. I have pets too, but you need to know the home inspector will write up a fire door that has a pet door installed.

Some home inspectors will write up a fire door that has a door stop installed because it overrides the purpose and proper function of the door.

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Door Defects & Related Injury Claims - A Guided Tour of Manual Doors & Hardware

We are all used to opening and closing doors on a daily basis. Unless you encounter a problem with the function of your doors, you probably don't give their operation and component make up much thought. I am continually contacted by attorneys seeking my advice on an injury that took place because of an improperly adjusted or malfunctioning door. In this article, I am simply discussing manually operated doors. Nothing fancy or automatic about them, the kind where you grab a lever, push a plate or bang on a bar to enter or leave a room or building. So, if you want to learn to communicate professionally and simply with your door expert or even your building manager, read on.

Doors are actually a pretty simple and early invention. They probably started with a couple of wide planks to enclose an opening to keep out the weather or separate your belongings from the animals. Modern door systems are much more complex, but still do the basics. They keep your stuff protected from the elements, animals and other people.

While this article is in no means meant to be exhaustive and highly technical, there are a few things that need identification in order for all of us to properly understand their functions and be able to effectively communicate information.

A basic door system is made up of a framed opening, hinges, door, and door latch or lock. As separation and security requirements increase, the door system begins to increase in complexity. The basic door is either considered an unrated fire separation component or a rated fire separation component.

Unrated doors, frames and hardware:

Unrated doors are installed in locations that do not participate in keeping a fire contained. They are typical in most home locations, with the usual exception of a garage to interior home doorway. Unrated doors may be approved for some exterior exit doorways in commercial buildings, as well as interoffice openings. You have probably seen wooden raised panel doors, hollow slab doors, or hand carved ornate doors that appear more like artwork than a doorway. These doors are typically unrated, and do a fine job maintaining separation and privacy in our homes and offices. We are able to use these types of unrated doors in many locations, both residential and commercially, because designers or architects have located fire control walls and separations as part of the building design that make individual fire walls unnecessary. These doorways do not have the stringent requirements for their hardware, frames or doors that a fire rated doorway must have.

Fire rated door systems:

Fire rated doors, along with other augmented system components are able to contain a fire without burning through for a known and tested period of time. Typical ratings of fire doors are 20, 45, 60, 90, and 180 minutes. Uniform building codes and local fire codes determine the appropriate separations needed for a specific area of every building.

A fire rated opening is only as good as its weakest component. Therefore, along with a rated door, you need to have a rated frame assembly. There are many types of fire rated frames in the commercial market. Frames also undergo specific testing to rate their ability to withstand fire for a period of time. Commercially available standard rated frames are made from a variety of products. Rating can be achieved for hollow metal steel frames, aluminum frames, and specially treated wood frames. The correct application and method of attachment of each type of these frames will limit or rate the opening to match the condition and rating of the wall that it is part of.

Frames are made up of a minimum of three components: A left leg, a right leg, (both vertical pieces) and the header (horizontal piece of the frame). Other more complex frames have the three components plus a clipped on casing mold. Some frames, particularly when associated and required with more stringent fire ratings will be fabricated into one welded assembly. Appropriate installation of all frames requires sturdy and positive attachment to the wall opening and floor system. To assure that the door will not be blown out of the framed opening during a fire, fire rated hardware must be used in conjunction with the fire rated frame. Ratings are given to hinges, door locks, panic bars and other locking devices and related components. To increase the effective barrier from a fire, a seal or gasket of some sort must be used around the opening of the door, as well as along the door bottom. In conjunction with these smoke seals there needs to be a non-combustible threshold between the floor and door sweep. These seals are in place to protect the occupants of an adjacent room from smoke or poisonous gases released from a fire, and are designed to allow more time for evacuation from the fire zone.

Let's talk about how to describe a door opening:

It is important to accurately explain what a door opening looks like and how it functions over the phone so that both parties are visualizing the same type of opening. If you want to do a little preliminary investigation, here are some things that are helpful in describing the door and frame to your expert. First, measure the opening so that you know the rough height and width of the door. The height measurement is taken between the floor and header piece location where the door rests. The width measurement is taken between the door legs at the widest point where the door rests between the legs of the frame. More information about door frames later in this article. A typical commercial door measurement might be 84" high x 36" wide. The actual door size will be slightly smaller, but that is not important for this exercise. A residential door, particularly in older homes, may be 80"high x 32" wide. Obviously, site conditions vary from location to location. Exact measurements may be critical later on in your case, but that is why you have contacted an expert to investigate.

Next, determine if the door opens into the room that you are standing in or away from that room. Does the door swing from the left or right side? Here is a tip on how to figure this out. If you are standing inside a room that the door swings into: Place your back against the door and see if the hinges are on the right side of your body or the left side. If right, you have a right hand door, if left, it is left handed. Remember this saying: "Your BUTT to the hinge BUTT". If you are in a room outside of where the door swings into, it gets a little more confusing as to how to describe the handing, but for simplicity, just look into the room and see if the door swings to the right or the left. It may be important to know, as your case may "HINGE".... Ha, ha, ha...on this detail!

Now that the hard part is done, take a look at the door. What is it made of? Wood, Metal, glass, plastic laminate, etc... Does it have a label of any kind on it indicating a fire rating or special information? Does it have any distinguishing features such as scarring, scratches, damage of any kind? Generally, what condition is the door in? Does it look old or show wear, or is it new and in good shape? Is the door dragging on the floor or rubbing on the frame? Swing the door a few times to see if something is not working properly.

Now, check out the hardware on the door. How many hinges are attached to the door and frame? Do the hinges appear to be solidly attached to the door? Are the screws loose and pulling out of the door or frame? Measure what size the hinges are, if you can. Measure from the top of the hinge to the bottom of one hinge only. They should all be the same size. Are they? Note what color they are. Are they rusty, covered in dust or grease, old or new looking? Does the door have any type of knob or lever on it? Does it have a key lock? Is it activated remotely or by some sort of touch pad? Does it have a panic bar exit device on it, or are we looking at a conventional door lock set? Does it have a round orbit type of knob or a lever to activate the lock? Does the door have a door closer on it? Is the closer on the inside of the door or the outside of the door? What condition does the overall hardware seem to be in? Are there kick plates or push plates on the door? Take a photograph of the door, if you can, for your file.

Actual Case Experience: Several years ago an early photograph of a door problem, taken immediately after an injury happened, showed that changes had been made to installed hardware. It was claimed by the opposition, during written discovery and deposition testimony that no alterations of any kind had been done to the doors since the injury occurred. After a site visit, I was given the early photos to evaluate, and immediately saw that the hardware had all been changed. This revelation led to some pretty interesting settlement negotiations in favor of my client. So get the pictures, if possible!

As long as you are examining the door, you should take a brief look at the frame and the frames' attachment to the wall. How is the frame oriented to the wall? Is there any space on either side of the wall, and what proximity to a perpendicular wall does it have? Is the frame metal, wood or some other material? Does it have a fire rated label or specialty tag on it? Does it appear to be solidly attached to the wall? Are the hinges solidly attached to the frame and door? Does the frame look scratched or worn, and are there grooves or dents?

Now that you have made a preliminary evaluation of the door, you are through with your basic inspection. You have seen firsthand what the site conditions are, and hopefully used my suggestions to evaluate the door for yourself.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Choosing the Right Storm Door From an Expert Storm Door Installer's Perspective

Making the decision to add or change a storm door to your house can drastically change the look of your home. It is important to choose the right storm door that fits with the look of your house. When choosing a storm door, there are 5 main things to consider: Price, Material, Size, Handing, and Style.

Pricing on Storm Doors

First and foremost, you should stick to your budget. Storm doors range in price from around $100-$300 for standard size doors that you can find at Lowe's or Home Depot to around $300-$500 for custom sized doors ordered from the same retailers. Now be realistic, while you may find a coupon that gives you a good deal, a $100 screen door is not going to perform like a $500 storm door.

Now you may ask, "What makes a $500 storm door better than a $100 storm door?" The answer is the materials and the bells and whistles. Vinyl storm doors are less expensive than extruded aluminum storm doors. While you save money on the price, they will wear out faster because of exposure to the elements. However, you can get a wood-core vinyl door which is more sturdy and provides better insulation for a little bit more money. On a higher-end door you may get a choice of custom colors like cranberry, hunter green, or almond where on the lower end you can only have white or black. With more expensive doors you can usually choose a hardware color ranging from brass or silver to oil-rubbed bronze and antique brass. One important difference is most top end doors come with 2 door closure pistons instead of 1. They are mounted at the top and bottom of the door instead of just having one at the top of the storm door. This gives the door better rigidity and allows you to adjust the speed more. Keep in mind that the cost of a separate piston is only about $5.00, so don't spend an extra $100 on a door just to get a second door closure.

The best way to get a sense of the price is to either go into a national retailer like Lowe's or Home Depot and look at the storm doors or search online If you go to a store, be aware that while some associates may have general knowledge, most do not know the first thing about storm doors. I personally try to avoid them because in my experience none of them has ever actually installed a storm. To make matters worse, their training is minimal and they give cookie-cutter answers to all your questions. Personally, I like to shop online to compare prices and narrow down more what I am looking for.

Another thing to consider about pricing is that most storm doors are Energystar compliant, which means that your new door qualifies for an IRS tax credit. The credit can be up to as much as $500 and is claimed on your next years taxes. So keep in mind that you can save money on your taxes by purchasing a higher end door. For more information, refer to our Storm Door Information page.