Thursday, March 28, 2013

A Review of the Most Popular Garage Door Openers

Genie, Chamberlain, Sears, Wayne-Dalton, Linear, and Universal (SkyLink) make some of the best garage door openers on the market. The following product reviews should be useful for those in the market for a garage door opener.

The Genie® Company is one of the most well-known and trusted companies in the US. Founded in 1923 under the name of the Alliance Manufacturing company, Genie manufactures consumer, industrial as well as military products. The Genie® brand of garage door openers are very popular for their high power remote-controlled garage door opening systems.

Genie produces a wide range of garage door openers and the most popular brands from Genie are: the Excelerator, the Screw Drive and the Chain Glide. Other brands include the Alliance, the Blue Max, the Crusader, Python, Pro-Max, Lift-a-door, OverHead Door, Norelco, Code-Dodger and Intellicode.

Genie uses state-of-the-art technology in its garage door openers. The Intellicode® remote access security system changes the security code to one of billions of combinations each time the transmitter is used, thus making it one of the safest systems in the world. Its Sate-T-Beam(TM) infrared beam system can sense the presence of objects in the door's path and can thus prevent damage to equipment. Genie garage door openers can be installed on both single as well as double doors. They use ½ horsepower and can work on doors that are up to 8 feet high. Genie garage door openers open twice as fast as other garage door openers but close at normal speeds. They are very quiet, have a bright, wide-angle lighting and powerful motor design and can work in any weather conditions. Such advanced technologies make the Genie brand of garage door openers most popular in the world.

Chamberlain GmbH based in Saarwellingen, Germany is a principal supplier of residential garage door openers, commercial and residential gate operators, and remote controls in the world. The company has offices in France, England, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic and Singapore. Chamberlain products are available almost across the whole world.

Chamberlain offers garage door openers in commercial as well as residential varieties. Chamberlain®, Whisper Drive® and Power Drive® Garage Door Openers are the most popular brands from Chamberlain.
LiftMaster® is the most popular brand from Chamberlain. This range also includes the Liftmaster garage door opener remotes, replacement parts, mini transmitters, keychain remotes and other accessories. LiftMaster garage door openers are available in different drive and horsepower modes and are combined with a wide range of accessories and options. The LiftMaster range contains: the Estate Series, the Premium series and the Contractor series. These are available in the belt drive; screw drive as well as in chain drive models.

Chamberlain's Power Drive® and Whisper Drive® belong to the residential garage door opener category in the do-it-yourself range. The Elite(TM) range contains premier residential and commercial gate operators and access control systems. The Sentex® range is for secure residential and commercial garages.

Sears Holdings Corporation, parent of Kmart and Sears, Roebuck and Co., is the third largest broad line retailer in the US. Sears Holdings is a leading supplier of tools, lawn and garden, home electronics, and automotive repair and maintenance. It supplies the Craftsman range of garage door openers.

Craftsman supplies power tools, storage chests and cabinets, bench power tools, mechanics tools, power tool accessories, general hand tools, compressor tools, carpentry tools and home security and garage door openers and accessories. The Craftsman range of garage door openers consist of simple ½ hp garage door opener, ¾ hp garage door opener in chain drive models. Other products include the universal remote control conversion kit with 1 remote, the 10ft chain drive extension kit, the 10ft extension kit for garage door opener, the 8ft extension kit for garage door opener, the 8ft rail extension kit, the Remote control, 3-function security, keyless entry pad, plug-in light control for garage door opener, the wireless garage door monitor and the extension kit (screw drive).

Wayne Dalton, established in 1954, is the producer and supplier of the safest residential and commercial garage doors and garage door openers in the US. Wayne Dalton supplies two kinds of garage door openers: wall mount and ceiling mount. The wall mount openers, an exclusive product from Wayne Dalton, can be mounted on the wall beside the door. This helps to eliminate the chains, belts, screw drive and tract that usually clutter the garage ceiling. This model also helps to eliminate noise and vibration to a large extent.

The Linear Corporate is a major producer of security systems like garage door and garage door openers. Linear produces garage door openers accessories like the Linear Act 21 key chain transmitter, Linear DR3A Linear Moore-O-Matic gate or garage opener receiver, Linear DT2A gate or garage door opener replacement transmitter, Linear DTC Moore-O-Matic Delta 3 Remote (same as DTD or DT) gate or garage door opener replacement transmitter, Linear DTKP wireless keypad, Linear MDR Megacode System single channel receiver, Linear MDT-1 and MDT-2 Megacode gate or garage door openers, Linear MDTK wireless keypad model, Linear MT-1B channel visor block coded transmitter, Linear MT-2B channel visor block coded transmitter etc.

Linear also makes the Stanley range of garage door opener parts and accessories like Vemco, Quiet Glide, LightMaker, Home Innovative, Whistler, Popular Mechanics, SecureCode.

Friday, March 1, 2013

Guide to Patio Door Types

Traditional or modern? Classic or contemporary? Varying tastes and different architectures throughout the years, as well as innovations and enhanced lifestyles, have given rise to the wide choice in patio door variations currently available in Britain. This article aims to describe the types of patio doors - their styles and functionality, similarities and differences, together with some of their main advantages and popular options - in order to provide readers with an informative guide.

Styles - French doors, sliding panels: retractable: folding doors, slide-and-pivot doors.

The latest patio doors innovation is slide-and-pivot doors. Developed and launched since 2007/8, slide-and-pivot doors incorporate the major benefits of bifolding doors and sliding patio doors. Comprising a number of individual glazed panels that fit snugly together when closed, there is a 'master' door that can be opened with a standard (pivot) action, enabling the other doors to be moved, individually, along the top and bottom guides; as each door is moved to the end of the guides, it can also pivot open to increase the access width between the divided areas ( to a suggested maximum of approximately 8 metres).

Because slide-and-pivot doors have no hinges, there is no requirement for a sturdy side frame; its only purpose is to cover the gasket that seals the double glazed unit. This means that the views afforded through the expanse of patio doors have minimal interruptions. At the time of writing, there are two versions of frame-less glass doors available in the UK, both using the slide-and-pivot technique: one manufacturer supplies their frameless glass doors with kite-marked double glazed units which have a visible seal, the other uses an almost transparent method of sealing their double glazing. Contemporary by design, the absence of visible characteristics makes frameless glass doors a viable option for period properties.

Bi Folding doors were launched around the turn of the century; they can be installed in place of French doors, where both doors are hinged to fold as they open together to one side. Bi folding doors can also span an opening to around 7 metres wide, depending on the frame chosen. A 'master' door can be placed amongst the doors, at the ends or in the middle, wherever the opening is required; this door is a standard (pivot) opening door which enables the other doors to be pushed to the side or sides of the aperture, resulting in a sliding-folding action, concertina-style, to maximise the width of the opening between home and garden or conservatory.

Originally, patio doors were all of the French Door variety; that is, a pair of doors that are hinged at the sides and open from the middle, each door pivoting in- or out-wards. French doors are still popular, especially with builders of new homes, as they are comparatively cheap and easy to accommodate in place of windows and offer an alternative evacuation route for families, especially for elderly or disabled people, to meet improved fire safety requirements.

Arguably, French doors could be considered as retractable as each door can be pulled back. The advantage of retractable doors is that maximum access is possible between the two sides of the aperture whereas sliding panel doors generally overlap unless built to retract into a recess.

In the mid-20th century, sliding doors became very popular - two or three panels of glass that slide along grooves in the floor. To distinguish them from traditional French doors, they were marketed with the thoroughly modern name of Patio Doors and this is often the image people have today when that term is used. Easily installed in place of a window, the immediate advantages were additional natural light and access to the garden. They also became a popular option to use where a pivot door opening space was limited or where the aperture was wider than a pair of French doors. Older installations were typically single-glazed, prone to warping and usually became difficult to slide open and closed. Still available today but in a developed form with double glazing and rollers for easier sliding, the popularity of sliding doors during this century has declined as bifolding doors gained market share.

Frame Styles - timber, metal, pvc, composite, frameless, profiles and sight lines.

Patio doors comprise an outer frame plus individual door frames. These can be made from wood (soft- and/or hard-wood), metal or alloys (usually aluminium), pvc (polyvinyl chloride, a thermo-plastic polymer - the 'u' stands for unplasticised) or a composite material, which may comprise any of the foregoing materials plus grp (glass reinforced polymer). There is also a style known as frameless, where the vertical sides of each door have no frames.

Generally, timber frames are considered more traditional and can look beautiful! Hard wood such as oak is, as the name suggests, far more hard-wearing than a soft wood such as pine. Weather, especially strong sun, can take its toll on timber frames which could need to be varnished or painted annually. Wooden frames can swell and shrink with humidity, therefore opening and closing doors can require force and gaps can allow draughts in colder temperatures.

Metal frames, usually aluminium, provide strength in compact form. As notoriously good conductors (which is a bad attribute for insulation), frames made from aluminium are thermally-broken, which is a good attribute. It means that the metals on the inside and outside of the door frames are not joined, preventing the temperatures from being transferred between them. A bare metal frame would look completely unattractive so it is powder-coated in a choice of over 100 standard colours, including a white that resembles pvc.

As with timber, the quality of pvc frames available can vary - and generally, you get what you pay for. The better ones will usually be reinforced with metal, internally, for greater strength but the cheaper options can be a nightmare to live with - sticking, twisting, splitting, discolouring, warping - often within a very short time. Most usually supplied as white, some manufacturers offer limited colour options or wood effect finishes.

Generally stronger than pvc, composite patio door frames vary with each manufacturer, offering a variety of finishes.

Whilst frameless doors have no side frames, the top and bottom of each door requires a mechanism, typically presented in aluminium, to allow it to slide within the top and bottom guides. Frameless glass doors have the best sight lines.

Sight lines is the term used to describe the interruptions in the view through the doors; in other words, the width of the vertical opaque areas between the glass when the doors are closed. On hinged doors, such as French doors and bi folding doors, timber and pvc frames generally have broad sight lines because, unlike aluminium, narrower frames would not be strong enough to be fit for purpose. As a guide to the width of two frames together, cheaper pvc door frames can exceed 200mm, aluminium frames are typically between 135mm and 160mm and frameless patio doors sight lines are under 40mm. Depending on the width of each door and number of doors to be installed, the difference in glass to frame ratio could be significant.